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drinks to avoid f.d.a. oversight. we've called on the agency to regulate energy drinks that have caffeine levels well above the 71 milligrams per 12-ounce threshold in soft drinks. today senator blumenthal and i asked the f.d.a. commissioner to meet with us to personally meet with us after thanksgiving to discuss the steps the f.d.a. is taking to ensure the safety of energy drinks. every other week we're seeing mounting evidence that energy drinks pose safety risks. you learn about young people hospitalized or seriously hurt after consuming what are marketed as little energy pick pick-me-ups. we look forward to working with commissioner hamburg to protect our children and to protect everyone in america from these die tear supplements, whether it is 5-hour energy or the monster energy drink which led to the death of this 14-year-old girl in maryland. mr. president, it's been many years since came to this floor and argued about dietary supplements. we all know what's involved here. i always preface my remarks by saying when i got up this morning i took my vitamin, i took my fish oi
will drive calf too, that's where the energy needs to be put. that's where the biggest bang for the buck will be in the business because, remember, as we looked at these more than minor changes in the financials of the telephone companies across the country, it was so important that we do these two things coi understand didn'tly. -- coincidentally. we got out of sync, one down efficiently and fast. we just have to work the usf thing, and it's about the consumer. >> host: jeff gardner, president and ceo of the windstream corporation. he is also chairman this year of the u.s. telecom trade association. he's been our guest on "the communicators" along with paul barbagallo of bloomberg. gentlemen, thank you. >> guest: thank you.Ñsr >> next, the interim america dialogue discusses the results of the november 6th elections and implications for latin america. panelists discuss the prospects for change with the obama add enrings' policies involving immigration, trade, drug policy, and economic cooperation. this is about an hour and ten minutes. >> this morning, we're going to have a conversation
that are important for queer communities -- the energy that we are putting around marriage equality issue. >> this is an important question. issues of employment discrimination are critically important. even things like health care disparity, if you will, the reality of where lbgt people are, it is not quite clear and it doesn't bubble up to what is being talked about right now. because marriage equality had been at the forefront. and i do think in some ways, it is why the national gays and lesbians have spent so much time trying to broaden this to make sure that transgendered people in those issues are included in all the work that we do. it is widely thought very hard to make sure that gender identity is included in the employment nondiscrimination act. because we could go the other way with incremental progress with his progress. but we would've left out a whole swath of the community. folks who have greater experiences of discrimination, violence is still an issue. we forget that people are still being violently attacked because of who they are and because of who they love. i think a
technological revolution has reenergize the american north american energy market and is fundamentally reshaping global politics short -- toward the traditional powers in the west rather than away from them, you think about drones, the war on terror, technology has allowed a lead foot print that is far more effective in many respects, at least at the specific task of getting bad guys without much direct involvement on the ground than anybody would ever have imagined a few years ago. it's a changing technological environment working to overturn established powered orders or to reinforce establish power orders. >> that is open to all of you. >> as you say, this is an ebb and flow and always has been, just as the american sense of one we want to intervene and when we want to pull back. whether you believe it is a 70 year cycle or in a year cycle or whatever, the technological flow goes in a much faster cycle. so in the past ten years, for sure, i think it has reinforced american power because, as you look at what president bush was doing in his second term, what president obama has doubled down on
, afghanistan/pakistan and u.s. energy policy as the six top issues. so starting with that, looking at it strategically, do you feel that those are the core issues before president obama and this administration and our country going into 2013? um, if not, what would you change, what would you add? >> i -- when i was informed by lori murray about the outcome of the process by which the world affairs councils went through and came up with those six issues, i thought you had it exactly right. i think those are the big issues, and congratulations to you. i think you have them just right. i think there is an overarching issue on top of all of them that in some sense effects and enables all of them x that is if you look at at the national security challenges and the foreign policy challenges we face, i say that the number one challenge is getting our fiscal house in order. getting a handle on the debt, getting a handle on the deficit which are critical in order to get the economy growing again and people back to work. and i think that is the over -- it's certainly the number one domestic
. presumably they felt they could win and they spent the time energy and money to put on the ballot that because the coalition when they would come out with a religious argument with you saw were fair-minded religious leaders standing up countering what they were saying and that's something we haven't seen as aggressively in the past. they also are simply losing support. i was on a panel today and this was much more exciting with brian browner once the national organization for marriage and he is desperately spinning and he talks about the state that he talks about how they were outspent this time. they had seen their support shrank. they're not going to go away and they will learn their lessons and i agree with patrick. i think they could come back in a very forceful way that they have seen their support shrank. they have seen their grassroots support strank strength in their donor base shrink. the mormon church is a player we did not see in these campaigns. they were the dominant player in prop 8. you also saw a lot of individual donors on that side that were not there this time w
capital is a big drag, but on the other hand, there's energy prices low. you've got a low relatively -- natural gas, you got housing, having apparently hit bottom, starting to turn, so there's a variety of things. there's a lot of money on the sidelines. >> you raised china. talk about china for a second. the united states, europe, japan, latin america, asia excluding china, every one of those regions experienced a financial and economic crisis in the last 20 years. china stands out as not having gone through such turmoil. can they continue? can they keep that up? is china the next country that we have to worry about for some kind of economic upheaval? >> i'll start. well, the short term, i think what's important for people to understand this year with the political transition is the chinese leadership has a real fear of inflation, and this goes back to 89. they were going o error on the side of being careful with food prices, higher inflation. now that they are threw that, what you start to see if they've got the resources to be able to avoid a hard landing, but the critical questio
it is they were going to do anyway. >> i think we can have one last question. >> jim gingrich, energy research. to respond on gems comment on american policy. the review of the effective drug strategy, and does this represent an increasing militarization of american foreign policy? >> that's a very good question. question is to turn approach in yemen and elsewhere a reflection of u.s. foreign policy -- is greater militarization. >> yeah, that is a very, very big question. with regards to yemen, i definitely think you are onto something and i think there's a couple of reasons out what to very briefly and in closing. one is that drones, you know, there's a sense that using drone strikes, using airstrikes as a way that the affect the really combat its enemies without putting american forces at risk and with a sort of suffering the casualties we've seen in iraq and afghanistan. and while i think that maybe true long-term come i have great concerns about the potential blowback from his actions and that the potential casualties will be later on. that's a very difficult argument to make. i don't thin
-term recovery was at the stimulus really did begin this long-term reinvestment. it was by far the largest energy bill in the history of the country. we been spending a few billion dollars a year. the stimulus port and 90 billion, just a complete game changer for wind, solar and other renewables, energy efficiency and every imaginable form. [applause] i got for saying he thinks. for this marker, electric vehicles, biofuels, clean energy research and the technologies of tomorrow and factories to build the stuff in the united states. not just energy, but the stimulus is going to drag our antiquated health care system into the digital era so that your doctor might not kill you at this chicken scratch handwriting by 2015 just about every american will have an electronic medical record, which really should improve care and reduce costs and is really a down payment on health care reform. this included the most ambitious education reform in decades with race to the top of the largest infrastructure investment since eisenhower. it had the largest research investment other, the largest middle-class tax cu
on tax reform, and then work on these problems like energy, comprehensive energy problems that are opportunity and making. so i am much were optimistic than some. imagine hubert humphrey. actually the original he gave me gordon humphrey suggested by mistake or little-known senator from new hampshire. but eventually they corrected it. >> the president has just given a press covers but i do not get the chance to hear it but he was sounding feisty on the issue of taxes. he seemed to be saying that he was given a mandate in this election by the american people, not to continue with tax cuts for the wealthiest americans. he said if there is one difference between mitt romney and his campaign, it was that he opposes the idea of the wealthiest continuing to have those tax cuts. if that is the position of the president and it continues to be the position of the democrats, isn't going to hold things up in terms of budget negotiation with republican colleagues? >> i look at this one simple way and that is i want to bring the debt debt. when you look at the bush tax cuts, and the way
idea and harness some of the energy around the idea and help some of the individual part of the party going forward. i think he'll help them. >> you were with the president in iowa a emotional place for him. he doesn't have anymore campaign ahead of him. give us a short picture what it was like being with him as it was coming to an end. >> he's not a very publicly emotional guy as most people know. he said later that he was struck by the last event. everybody is tired. you're the walking dead. both campaigns. every reporter. you're trying to make it through. but he looked out that night and saw all these faces of a these people who believed with him and with him in 2007. i don't mean random faces. i mean, three or people he actually recognized and knew and kind of waivedded at him and waived back. and that's struck him. i think it impacted him. you could see he got a little emotional. he was reflective as it sounds like romney was as well. i remember morning of the election we were waiting to do the interviews the day of election. he said i thought how about romney and his supporters
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11